“As he read, I fell in love the way you fall asleep: slowly, and then all at once.” ― John Green, The Fault in Our Stars

Reading is one of the fundamental habits that we learn as a child. Even before our temporal abilities are decently developed (usually by the end of third month after birth), people sing songs, lullabies, read stories or make interesting noises to stimulate our brain. Not much later, reading becomes out favorite activity where we have already irritated our parents to read Winnie-the-Pooh over and again for umpteenth time. This habit, however, grows only up to the teenage years and then starts to diminish, only to increase again later in life.1

A simple Google search yields thousands of blog posts, articles and research papers discussing the benefits. Although, all of those can be discussed in much finer details and every point be further analyzed, it suffices to say that reading is important for personal development and growth of social, economic and civic life (Holden, 2004); almost as if it a prerequisite for all cultural and social activities. Not only one becomes a better reader, writer and self-confident person but also creative by experience other worlds and newer roles in imagination.

“Imagination is more important than knowledge. For knowledge is limited to all we now know and understand, while imagination embraces the entire world, and all there ever will be to know and understand.” ― Albert Einstein

blog by Vivek Rai